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Same here, I'm curious about high it revs up.

Some other info on the 7.3L:

Configuration: 90-degree V-8, single in-block camshaft
Block: Cast iron
Heads: Aluminum
Crankshaft: Forged steel
Displacement: 7.3L (445ci)
Bore x Stroke: 4.22 inches x 3.98 inches
Compression: 10.5:1
Valvetrain: Pushrod and rocker arms, two valves per cylinder
Fuel Delivery: Sequential multi-port
Horsepower: 430 @ 5,500 rpm
Torque: 475 @ 4,000 rpm
You could get a glimpe of the tach in the video and it seemed to me he was running between 4-5k. But thats just a guess after several times watching it.
 

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Look at the pre orders on the new Bronco last i heard they were way over 130,000 and a big block tang would also be in high demand if the price isn't sky high..
I remember trying to visit the site on launch to see what the prices were and it kept crashing over and over. It was nuts.
 

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I remember trying to visit the site on launch to see what the prices were and it kept crashing over and over. It was nuts.
I've been there several times without issue trying to decide which trim package to order. I am reluctant to order i guess hoping to see at least a hybrid version added.
 

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Same here, I'm curious about high it revs up.

Some other info on the 7.3L:

Configuration: 90-degree V-8, single in-block camshaft
Block: Cast iron
Heads: Aluminum
Crankshaft: Forged steel
Displacement: 7.3L (445ci)
Bore x Stroke: 4.22 inches x 3.98 inches
Compression: 10.5:1
Valvetrain: Pushrod and rocker arms, two valves per cylinder
Fuel Delivery: Sequential multi-port
Horsepower: 430 @ 5,500 rpm
Torque: 475 @ 4,000 rpm
If you want to get a Godzilla engine for your own it will cost you $8,150 from Ford. You get a long block with 10.5:1 compression, aluminum cylinder heads, a throttle body, exhaust manifolds, ignition coils, and a production flex plate.

The Truth About Cars has a great article on it.


Aptly nicknamed Godzilla, Ford’s massive new 7.3-liter V8 pushrod engine that debuted last year in the 2020 F-250 is now available in crate engine form from Ford Performance Parts.

Originally a mythical Jurassic creature that evolved from a sea reptile into a terrestrial monster, Godzilla was awakened by mankind’s nuclear weapons tests in the inaugural film. Over time, as the franchise evolved, Godzilla and other creatures in the films have become metaphors for social commentary on the real world. Godzilla and his fellow monsters embodied the emotions and social problems of the times.

With 430 horsepower and 475 lb-ft of torque, the 7.3-liter V8 features an overhead valve architecture, cam-in-block design, variable-displacement oil pump, extra-large main bearings, a forged steel crankshaft for durability, and piston-cooling jets to help manage temperatures under heavy load. Godzilla has a displacement of 445 cubic inches or 7.3 liters. It’s more compact as a pushrod engine than an overhead cam modular motor like the Coyote, which should allow it to fit into a wider range of vehicles without having to remove shock towers or alter the front suspension.

Is the 7.3-liter Ford engine a worthy challenger to General Motors’ LS engines, which also utilize a smaller package size and a simpler valvetrain? A lighter engine is cheaper to build and modify, which are the reasons why the LS engine is so popular in so many different types of vehicles, from drift cars to overlanders. What we don’t know yet is how much power can Ford’s new 7.3-liter V8 produce when it’s allowed to run wild.

Godzilla lists at $8,150, and what you get is a dressed long block with 10.5:1 compression, aluminum cylinder heads, a throttle body, exhaust manifolds, ignition coils, and a production flex plate. What you end up installing it in, and the resultant trouble you get into is entirely up to you. As Blue Oyster Cult once wrote, “History shows again and again, how nature points up the folly of man, Godzilla!”

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Discussion Starter #31
I've been there several times without issue trying to decide which trim package to order. I am reluctant to order i guess hoping to see at least a hybrid version added.
I heard it could be another year or two till Ford offers it. Have you looked at the Wrangler 4xe?
 

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I heard it could be another year or two till Ford offers it. Have you looked at the Wrangler 4xe?
no, is that the electric hybird one? Wranglers are bigger than i like but i keep coming close to buying a 2dr rubicon. I like the little rene trailhawk i have but it is to light duty for serious dirt stuff. The thing has got seriously thick strong skid plates under neath but the rear one id anchored in the back with one 3/8's sheet metal bolt into the unibody or what ever its called. Tore it loose by a gentle bottom tap over a water bar on an old logging road. Abnother issue i have is to change the oil you have to completely remove the front shid plate which weighs around 70 pounds. You would think they would have provided for changing the oil and solid mounting for the rear plate of more than one dumb screw. The dealer fixed the broken rear mount for me under warranty and he showed me what had happened before he repaired it. When i did the damage i was moving ast almost zero speed cause i knew it would be close. I have driven this trail at least a couple of hundred times over the years so i know where the obsticles are.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
no, is that the electric hybird one? Wranglers are bigger than i like but i keep coming close to buying a 2dr rubicon. I like the little rene trailhawk i have but it is to light duty for serious dirt stuff. The thing has got seriously thick strong skid plates under neath but the rear one id anchored in the back with one 3/8's sheet metal bolt into the unibody or what ever its called. Tore it loose by a gentle bottom tap over a water bar on an old logging road. Abnother issue i have is to change the oil you have to completely remove the front shid plate which weighs around 70 pounds. You would think they would have provided for changing the oil and solid mounting for the rear plate of more than one dumb screw. The dealer fixed the broken rear mount for me under warranty and he showed me what had happened before he repaired it. When i did the damage i was moving ast almost zero speed cause i knew it would be close. I have driven this trail at least a couple of hundred times over the years so i know where the obsticles are.
It is and seems to be checking off a lot of boxes with everything people love and want in a Wrangler. I hope you plan on test driving one as they arrive at dealers. If you haven't driven any hybrids that come close, then it could provide some general expectations.

Going back on topic, this dyno test shows the 7.3 easily deserves the 'Godzilla' name.
 

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It is and seems to be checking off a lot of boxes with everything people love and want in a Wrangler. I hope you plan on test driving one as they arrive at dealers. If you haven't driven any hybrids that come close, then it could provide some general expectations.

Going back on topic, this dyno test shows the 7.3 easily deserves the 'Godzilla' name.
Gonna need a shoe horn to get godzilla into a tang
 

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If you want to get a Godzilla engine for your own it will cost you $8,150 from Ford. You get a long block with 10.5:1 compression, aluminum cylinder heads, a throttle body, exhaust manifolds, ignition coils, and a production flex plate.

The Truth About Cars has a great article on it.


Aptly nicknamed Godzilla, Ford’s massive new 7.3-liter V8 pushrod engine that debuted last year in the 2020 F-250 is now available in crate engine form from Ford Performance Parts.

Originally a mythical Jurassic creature that evolved from a sea reptile into a terrestrial monster, Godzilla was awakened by mankind’s nuclear weapons tests in the inaugural film. Over time, as the franchise evolved, Godzilla and other creatures in the films have become metaphors for social commentary on the real world. Godzilla and his fellow monsters embodied the emotions and social problems of the times.

With 430 horsepower and 475 lb-ft of torque, the 7.3-liter V8 features an overhead valve architecture, cam-in-block design, variable-displacement oil pump, extra-large main bearings, a forged steel crankshaft for durability, and piston-cooling jets to help manage temperatures under heavy load. Godzilla has a displacement of 445 cubic inches or 7.3 liters. It’s more compact as a pushrod engine than an overhead cam modular motor like the Coyote, which should allow it to fit into a wider range of vehicles without having to remove shock towers or alter the front suspension.

Is the 7.3-liter Ford engine a worthy challenger to General Motors’ LS engines, which also utilize a smaller package size and a simpler valvetrain? A lighter engine is cheaper to build and modify, which are the reasons why the LS engine is so popular in so many different types of vehicles, from drift cars to overlanders. What we don’t know yet is how much power can Ford’s new 7.3-liter V8 produce when it’s allowed to run wild.

Godzilla lists at $8,150, and what you get is a dressed long block with 10.5:1 compression, aluminum cylinder heads, a throttle body, exhaust manifolds, ignition coils, and a production flex plate. What you end up installing it in, and the resultant trouble you get into is entirely up to you. As Blue Oyster Cult once wrote, “History shows again and again, how nature points up the folly of man, Godzilla!”

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Wonder if the dual turbo version is for sale?
 

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It will be a hot rod at that point haha.
I'm still skeptical about anything much bigger than what we currently have.
I agree. With modern technolgy there is no need for godzilla sized engine systems to get a thousand HP. An antique example is the pinto four banger that became a legend at the strip and was chosen by Ford to be the high HP engine and first proiduction turbo engine for the T bird. I was reading some place about a 1.2 L 475HP Ford engine in development for the F 150. A 1 liter???....Well why not there are several 2 L engines out there at 1,000 plus hp.....So why a 7.3 L?
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I agree. With modern technolgy there is no need for godzilla sized engine systems to get a thousand HP. An antique example is the pinto four banger that became a legend at the strip and was chosen by Ford to be the high HP engine and first proiduction turbo engine for the T bird. I was reading some place about a 1.2 L 475HP Ford engine in development for the F 150. A 1 liter???....Well why not there are several 2 L engines out there at 1,000 plus hp.....So why a 7.3 L?
Hence why I'm not 100% about this news. Ford can even go down in displacement and likely will.
If anything a small displacement (ex. 4.0) V8 turbo with hybrid for 'torque fill' is the way forward on the top of the line Mustang.
 

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Hence why I'm not 100% about this news. Ford can even go down in displacement and likely will.
If anything a small displacement (ex. 4.0) V8 turbo with hybrid for 'torque fill' is the way forward on the top of the line Mustang.
With the increasing energy density of batteries hybrids are on the way out. No combustion engine can compete as electric has max torque HP from the first rpm on. While the combustion engine screams to make rpm so it can get going the electric engine is already at the finish line. That coupled with the fact they are quiet, light weight and require almost no maintenence insurances their place in our future. I worked for a government agency that evaluated electrics before they were allowed on the streets so i drove most. Now this was twenty years ago and at that time top dog was the GM EV 1, that car held and maybe still holds, the land speed record for an electric car, 167mph <from memory>. The production EV1 available for lease was the exact same power train that set that speed record excet GM governed the top speed to 80mph. You could hit 80 before you got on the freeway the car was a rocket. The acceleration felt like a jet taking off from a short runway except there was no noise except for the air flow. You were just shoved back into the seat, whcih many found upsetting, and rocketed forward with quiet silky smooth power. But no one that i ever took for a ride or let drive one left without saying they wanted one. TheTesla's are in the same class with top speeds of around 150 and 0-60 in 2-3 seconds. If youve never driven a real electric go for a test drive in a Tesla and you will get a feel for what I'm saying.

But if all were electric i would miss the sound of a powerful engine and the shifting gears.....:(
 

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Discussion Starter #40
With the increasing energy density of batteries hybrids are on the way out. No combustion engine can compete as electric has max torque HP from the first rpm on. While the combustion engine screams to make rpm so it can get going the electric engine is already at the finish line. That coupled with the fact they are quiet, light weight and require almost no maintenence insurances their place in our future. I worked for a government agency that evaluated electrics before they were allowed on the streets so i drove most. Now this was twenty years ago and at that time top dog was the GM EV 1, that car held and maybe still holds, the land speed record for an electric car, 167mph <from memory>. The production EV1 available for lease was the exact same power train that set that speed record excet GM governed the top speed to 80mph. You could hit 80 before you got on the freeway the car was a rocket. The acceleration felt like a jet taking off from a short runway except there was no noise except for the air flow. You were just shoved back into the seat, whcih many found upsetting, and rocketed forward with quiet silky smooth power. But no one that i ever took for a ride or let drive one left without saying they wanted one. TheTesla's are in the same class with top speeds of around 150 and 0-60 in 2-3 seconds. If youve never driven a real electric go for a test drive in a Tesla and you will get a feel for what I'm saying.

But if all were electric i would miss the sound of a powerful engine and the shifting gears.....:(
Although hybrids can't compete, they do fit in well when its too early to launch an EV.
A good example is the 7th generation Mustang. I doubt Ford will jump right into an all-electric version but will instead take steps towards that
 
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